Creating a Sophisticated Stained Glass Look with Unicorn Spit Rainbow Gel Stain

Remember my Paint Project To-Do list from a few weeks ago?

Here’s the link if you forgot!

I am happy to report I just finished Project #3 from that list. Only 1 more to go! Woo hoo.

I transformed these beat-up matching side tables …

matching side tables_before… AND I answered a question I asked last week.

Can you use Unicorn Spit on “real life” furniture you enjoy in your home?

The answer is YES! Here are the tables now.

black unicorn spit tables1

black unicorn spit tables2

black unicorn spit tables_closeup1Unicorn Spit is a non-toxic rainbow gel stain we carry at our shop, All Things New Again in Leesburg, Virginia. I use Unicorn Spit to create all kinds of crazy, colorful looks on furniture, but last week I tried something different. I wanted to create a softer, more elegant finish that would fit nicely with many styles of decorating.

Here’s the link to the mid-century table I revived.

For these end tables, I wanted a sophisticated look with just a touch of glamour—and those glass inserts were perfect to create a faux stained-glass look using a technique called the stain-press.

Unicorn Spit can be used to create beautiful looks on glass.

Check out my Wine Bottle Art tutorial and video here.

First, you must prep the glass because Unicorn Spit will not stick directly to it. Paint the glass with any chalk-type paint or Mod Podge, which will stick to the glass and then the Unicorn Spit will stick to it. I used Mod Podge on these inserts because it dries clear.

I used black, white and yellow Spit and just squirted all three colors all over those glass panels in every crazy direction. Then I covered the squares with plastic wrap, squirted the plastic with water and ran my hand over the plastic to spread the spit around and create the design.

This part is really fun—and requires one hand to hold the plastic and another hand to push the Unicorn Spit around. I’m sorry, but I really wish I had a third hand I could use to photograph this process. Here’s the Big Reveal after the plastic was removed.

IMG_4204To finish your project, let the Unicorn Spit dry. I like to wait overnight with the stain-press technique because some spots will be thick and need longer drying time than usual. Then seal with an oil-based sealer. I used Minwax Polyurethane.

Once the sealer dries, flip the glass over and—voila!—faux stained glass. So pretty!

black unicorn spit tables_closeup2

black unicorn spit tables3

Pair of black end tables with faux stained glass inserts ~ Available for sale at All Things New Again, Leesburg, VA ~ Local pickup only

So that’s Project #3!

If you are keeping track … I already finished my Mother’s Day rocking chair and my shabby little bench using Real Milk Paint on both of those projects.

The last project on my to-do list was an amazing drop-leaf table I’m keeping for ME, but I went treasure hunting last weekend and came home with a whole new batch of projects to add to my list …

petite china cabinet_before

round table queen ann legs_before

table w carved legs_beforeSo I probably won’t get around to my drop-leaf table for awhile. 🙂

Hope you are having a great summer!

❤ Courtney

All Things New Again is a family-owned furniture and paint boutique located in Leesburg, Virginia (about an hour or so west of Washington, DC.)

We are one of the only shops in the country offering training on Unicorn Spit, an awesome new “creative juice” you can use to create one-of-a-kind looks on furniture—and more. Our next Introduction to Unicorn Spit class is on Sunday, August 21. No prior artistic experience needed. (Really!) 

You will practice several techniques—including the stain-press technique used here—plus go home with TWO completed projects. Class size is limited to three people to ensure individualized attention. Advanced registration is required. Sign up today before our class fills up!

Here’s the link.

 

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